You are here: Home Published Research Differential impact of respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus on the frequency of acute otitis media is explained by lower adaptive and innate immune responses in otitis-prone children.

David Verhoeven, Qingfu Xu, and Michael E Pichichero (2014)

Differential impact of respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus on the frequency of acute otitis media is explained by lower adaptive and innate immune responses in otitis-prone children.

Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 59(3):376–383.

Acute otitis media (AOM) is a leading cause of bacterial pediatric infections associated with viral upper respiratory infections (URIs). We examined the differential impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus URIs on the frequency of AOM caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) in stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) and non-otitis-prone (NOP) children as a potential mechanism to explain increased susceptibility to AOM.

Acute Disease, Adaptive Immunity, Child, Preschool, Female, HLA-DR Antigens, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Infant, Male, Nasopharynx, Otitis Media, Paramyxoviridae, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Syncytial Viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Toll-Like Receptor 7
Acute Disease, Adaptive Immunity, Child, Preschool, Female, HLA-DR Antigens, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Infant, Male, Nasopharynx, Otitis Media, Paramyxoviridae, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Syncytial Viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Toll-Like Receptor 7
 
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