You are here: Home Published Research Comparison study of single and concurrent administrations of carbapenem, new quinolone, and macrolide against in vitro nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae mature biofilms.

Yusaku Uemura, Liang Qin, Kenji Gotoh, Keisuke Ohta, Kei-ichiro Nakamura, and Hiroshi Watanabe (2013)

Comparison study of single and concurrent administrations of carbapenem, new quinolone, and macrolide against in vitro nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae mature biofilms.

Journal of infection and chemotherapy : official journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy, 19(5):902–908.

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen and a common cause of otitis media in children, chronic bronchitis, and pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Many studies have reported that NTHi is capable of producing biofilms, which may be one of the important factors involved in chronic diseases and accelerating antimicrobial resistance. Unfortunately, there is still no consensus about the elimination of biofilms. In this study, concurrent administrations of levofloxacin (LVFX)-imipenem (IPM) and clarithromycin (CAM)-IPM, as well as the single administration of IPM, LVFX, and CAM, were performed to treat the mature biofilms produced by NTHi, respectively. Biofilm inhibition was quantified using microtiter biofilm assay (MBA), and relative biomass was calculated as the ratio compared to that of untreated control biofilms. The relative biomasses of biofilms treated with IPM, LVFX-IPM, and CAM-IPM against a β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant strain was 1.10, 0.08, and 0.13 at 1× minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), 0.90, 0.05, and 0.07 at 10× MIC, and 0.80, 0.06, and 0.07 at 100× MIC, respectively. Biofilms were also visually observed by scanning electron microscopy, and a focused ion-beam system showed that high concentrations of combined administration strongly inhibited the biofilms, which was consistent with the results of MBA. Our data demonstrated the antibiofilm effect of concurrent administration against mature NTHi biofilms, which indicated a rationale for the potential use of concurrent administrations in diseases involving chronic NTHi biofilms.

Anti-Bacterial Agents, Biofilms, Carbapenems, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Macrolides, Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents, Biofilms, Carbapenems, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Macrolides, Quinolones
 
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