You are here: Home Published Research [Progress toward molecular determinants of the pathogenesis of disease due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae].

Guo-Zhong Tian, Li Zhang, and Zhu-Jun Shao (2009)

[Progress toward molecular determinants of the pathogenesis of disease due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae].

Zhongguo yi miao he mian yi, 15(2):174–179.

Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) is a pathogen exclusively found in humans. It causes a wide range of infections from the upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases. Such as pneumonia, septicemia and meningitis. Strains of Hi are usually classified into six serotypes a to f and nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHI) according to the antigenicities and compositions of their polysaccharide capsules. Hib was a common cause of serious infections in younger children. The polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines against Hib had almost eliminated H. influenzae as a cause of pediatric meningitis. However, NTHI remains an important pathogen, particularly in children and the elderly. Efforts to understand and control NTHI disease have been hampered by the diversity of these bacteria. This review introduced the study progress about pathogenic mechanism of NTHI. In order to provide the help for development of vaccine, clinic treatment and prevent the occurrence of diseases causing by NTHI.

Animals, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus Vaccines, Haemophilus influenzae, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans
Animals, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus Vaccines, Haemophilus influenzae, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans
 
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