You are here: Home Published Research Multilocus sequence typing and ftsI sequencing: a powerful tool for surveillance of penicillin-binding protein 3-mediated beta-lactam resistance in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

Dagfinn Skaare, Inger L Anthonisen, Dominique A Caugant, Andrew Jenkins, Martin Steinbakk, Linda Strand, Arnfinn Sundsfjord, Yngvar Tveten, and Bjørn-Erik Kristiansen (2014)

Multilocus sequence typing and ftsI sequencing: a powerful tool for surveillance of penicillin-binding protein 3-mediated beta-lactam resistance in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

BMC microbiology, 14(1):131.

Beta-lactam resistance in Haemophilus influenzae due to ftsI mutations causing altered penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) is increasing worldwide. Low-level resistant isolates with the N526K substitution (group II low-rPBP3) predominate in most geographical regions, while high-level resistant isolates with the additional S385T substitution (group III high-rPBP3) are common in Japan and South Korea.Knowledge about the molecular epidemiology of rPBP3 strains is limited. We combined multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and ftsI/PBP3 typing to study the emergence and spread of rPBP3 in nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) in Norway.

Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Preschool, Epidemiological Monitoring, Female, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genetic Variation, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Japan, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Norway, Penicillin-Binding Proteins, beta-Lactam Resistance
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Preschool, Epidemiological Monitoring, Female, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Genetic Variation, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Japan, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Norway, Penicillin-Binding Proteins, beta-Lactam Resistance
 
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