You are here: Home Published Research Incorporation of phosphorylcholine into the lipooligosaccharide of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae does not correlate with the level of biofilm formation in vitro.

Carmen Puig, Sara Marti, Peter WM Hermans, Marien I de Jonge, Carmen Ardanuy, Josefina LiƱares, and Jeroen D Langereis (2014)

Incorporation of phosphorylcholine into the lipooligosaccharide of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae does not correlate with the level of biofilm formation in vitro.

Infection and immunity, 82(4):1591–1599.

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes otitis media in children and community-acquired pneumonia or exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. A large variety of studies suggest that biofilm formation by NTHi may be an important step in the pathogenesis of this bacterium. The objective of this report was to determine the relationship between the presence of phosphorylcholine in the lipooligosaccharide of NTHi and the level of biofilm formation. The study was performed on 111 NTHi clinical isolates collected from oropharyngeal samples of healthy children, middle ear fluid of children with otitis media, and sputum samples of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or community-acquired pneumonia. NTHi clinical isolates presented a large variation in the level of biofilm formation in a static assay and phosphorylcholine content. Isolates collected from the oropharynx and middle ear fluid of children tended to have more phosphorylcholine and made denser biofilms than isolates collected from sputum samples of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or community-acquired pneumonia. No correlation was observed between biofilm formation and the presence of phosphorylcholine in the lipooligosaccharide for either planktonic or biofilm growth. This lack of correlation was confirmed by abrogating phosphorylcholine incorporation into lipooligosaccharide through licA gene deletion, which had strain-specific effects on biofilm formation. Altogether, we present strong evidence to conclude that there is no correlation between biofilm formation in a static assay and the presence of phosphorylcholine in lipooligosaccharide in a large collection of clinical NTHi isolates collected from different groups of patients.

Adult, Biofilms, Child, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Lipopolysaccharides, Phosphorylcholine
Adult, Biofilms, Child, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Lipopolysaccharides, Phosphorylcholine
 
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