You are here: Home Published Research Effects of bacterial infection on airway antimicrobial peptides and proteins in COPD.

Ganapathi I Parameswaran, Sanjay Sethi, and Timothy F Murphy (2011)

Effects of bacterial infection on airway antimicrobial peptides and proteins in COPD.

Chest, 140(3):611–617.

Pathogenic bacteria colonize the airways of 30% to 40% of patients with COPD and cause approximately 50% of exacerbations. New strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with exacerbations. Antimicrobial protein/peptides (AMPs) play important roles in innate lung defense against pathogens. To our knowledge, the changes in AMP baseline levels in respiratory secretions during bacterial colonization and exacerbation have not been described. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of the acquisition of a new strain of pathogenic bacteria on the airway levels of AMPs in patients with COPD.

Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides, Disease Progression, Female, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Inflammation, Lactoferrin, Male, Middle Aged, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Moraxellaceae Infections, Muramidase, Prospective Studies, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Secretory Leukocyte Peptidase Inhibitor, Sputum, beta-Defensins
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides, Disease Progression, Female, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Inflammation, Lactoferrin, Male, Middle Aged, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Moraxellaceae Infections, Muramidase, Prospective Studies, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Secretory Leukocyte Peptidase Inhibitor, Sputum, beta-Defensins
 
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