You are here: Home Published Research Haemophilus influenzae and smoking-related obstructive airways disease.

Diana C Otczyk, Robert L Clancy, and Allan W Cripps (2011)

Haemophilus influenzae and smoking-related obstructive airways disease.

International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 6:345–351.

Intralumenal bacteria play a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute infective episodes and airway inflammation. Antigens from colonizing bacteria such as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) may contribute to chronic lung disease through an immediate hypersensitivity response. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of specific NTHi-IgE antibodies in subjects with chronic bronchitis (CB) and COPD who had smoked.

Adult, Aged, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bronchitis, Chronic, Case-Control Studies, Chi-Square Distribution, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Immunoglobulin E, Male, Middle Aged, New South Wales, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Saliva, Severity of Illness Index, Smoking, Sputum, Young Adult
Adult, Aged, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bronchitis, Chronic, Case-Control Studies, Chi-Square Distribution, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Immunoglobulin E, Male, Middle Aged, New South Wales, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Saliva, Severity of Illness Index, Smoking, Sputum, Young Adult
 
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