You are here: Home Published Research Antimicrobial therapy issues facing pediatricians.

J. O Klein (1995)

Antimicrobial therapy issues facing pediatricians.

The Pediatric infectious disease journal, 14(5):415–419.

In the field of infectious diseases, the emergence of new pathogens or old diseases in newly recognized forms; changing virulence of pathogens; changing patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility; new diagnostic techniques, drugs or vaccines; changing concepts of chemoprophylaxis; controversies about medical vs. surgical techniques; and the challenge of care of children with infectious diseases within new guidelines of managed care are recently identified areas of change. The increased resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to many commonly used antimicrobials and the increased proportion of beta-lactamase-producing nontypable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis concern many practitioners. The decreased antibiotic susceptibility of S. pneumoniae is a relatively new phenomenon in the United States. Optimal therapy for mild, moderate or severe pneumococcal disease is dependent on current local susceptibility patterns. Group A streptococci are uniformly susceptible to readily achieved concentrations of all penicillins and cephalosporins. However, recent clusters of cases of rheumatic fever, increased recognition of toxic shock syndrome and bacteremic and localized severe pneumococcal disease have increased concern about the changing ecology of the Streptococcus and the implications for therapy. Finally recognition that many children with acute bacterial otitis media have resolution of disease without use of antimicrobial agents has led to more rigorous study designs for evaluating new drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Communicable Diseases, Drug Resistance, Microbial, Humans, Otitis Media, Penicillin Resistance, Pneumococcal Infections, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus pyogenes
Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Communicable Diseases, Drug Resistance, Microbial, Humans, Otitis Media, Penicillin Resistance, Pneumococcal Infections, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus pyogenes
 
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