You are here: Home Published Research Combined exposure to cigarette smoke and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae drives development of a COPD phenotype in mice.

Shyamala Ganesan, Adam T Comstock, Brenton Kinker, Peter Mancuso, James M Beck, and Uma S Sajjan (2014)

Combined exposure to cigarette smoke and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae drives development of a COPD phenotype in mice.

Respiratory research, 15:11.

Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major etiologic factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CS-exposed mice develop emphysema and mild pulmonary inflammation but no airway obstruction, which is also a prominent feature of COPD. Therefore, CS may interact with other factors, particularly respiratory infections, in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD.

Animals, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, HeLa Cells, Humans, Inhalation Exposure, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phenotype, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Smoking
Animals, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, HeLa Cells, Humans, Inhalation Exposure, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phenotype, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Smoking
 
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