You are here: Home Published Research Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and childhood pneumonia.

Allan W Cripps (2010)

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and childhood pneumonia.

Papua and New Guinea medical journal, 53(3-4):147–150.

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common microbe frequently isolated from the nasopharynx of children. Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children less than 5 years of age, with the burden of disease being greatest in developing countries. Determination of the bacterial aetiology of pneumonia is difficult due to sampling constraints. However, with a combination of sampling approaches, trans-thoracic fine-needle aspiration, blood culture and screened sputum, the evidence strongly suggests that NTHi is a significant causative pathogen of pneumonia in young children. However, further studies are required. The development of a new pneumococcal conjugate vaccine containing H. influenzae protein D has the potential to be beneficial against disease caused by NTHi, including pneumonia. With the implementation of this vaccine in many regions of the world where NTHi disease is endemic, it will be critical to introduce surveillance programs wherever it is used.

Child, Child, Preschool, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Papua New Guinea, Pneumonia, Bacterial
Child, Child, Preschool, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Papua New Guinea, Pneumonia, Bacterial
 
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