You are here: Home Published Research [Bacterial meningitis caused by beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in a 1-year-old girl: a case report].

Katsuaki Abe, Tadashi Hoshino, Naoko Imuta, Junichiro Nishi, and Naruhiko Ishiwada (2014)

[Bacterial meningitis caused by beta-lactamase-negative, ampicillin-resistant nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in a 1-year-old girl: a case report].

Kansenshogaku zasshi. The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, 88(3):291–296.

We present herein the case report of bacterial meningitis caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) in a 1-year-7-month-old girl with no medically significant history. NTHi from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the beta-lactamase non-producing ampicillin resistant strain (BLNAR). Some beta-lactams were administrated, but fever was prolonged. Finally, rifampicin seemed to be effective. In NTHi, compared with H. influenzae type b (Hib), the prevalence of BLNAR is high. Hence, complicated cases may increase in the near future if the use of the Hib vaccine becomes widespread, and meningitis caused by NTHi increases. It may be necessary to consider combination therapy or use of non-beta-lactams that have a different antimicrobial mechanism from beta-lactams. PCR analysis revealed the possibility that the CSF isolate lacked the P5 protein gene. Though deficiency of P5 fimbriae is known to reduce the affinity of NTHi for the human respiratory epithelium, determining whether P5 deficient NTHi induced meningitis will require further study.

Ampicillin Resistance, Female, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Meningitis, Haemophilus, beta-Lactamases
Ampicillin Resistance, Female, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Infant, Meningitis, Haemophilus, beta-Lactamases
 
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